P3-17. Is there an association between pain severity and vitamin D deficiency in IBD?

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Svein O Frigstad [1,2,3], Marte L Høivik [4], Jørgen Jahnsen [3,5], Milada Cvancarova [4,6], Tore Grimstad [7], Gert Huppertz-Hauss [8], Øistein Hovde [3,9], Tomm Bernklev [3,10], Bjørn Moum [3,4], Lars-Petter Jelsness-Jørgensen [11,12]
Affiliates: Department of Research, Østfold Hospital Trust, Grålum, Norway [1], Department of Medicine, Bærum Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway [2] , Institute of clinical medicine, University of Oslo, Norway [3], Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway [4], Department of gastroenterology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway [5], Oslo University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway [6], Department of Gastroenterology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway [7], Department of Research and Development, Telemark Hospital Trust, Skien, Norway [8], Department of Medicine, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Gjøvik, Norway [9], Department of Research and Development, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway [10], Department of Gastroenterology, Østfold Hospital Trust, Grålum, Norway [11], Department of Health Sciences, Østfold University College, Fredrikstad, Norway [12]

Background
Pain is commonly reported in IBD patients, and evidence suggests a multifactorial etiology. Vitamin D deficiency is known to cause muscle pain, but the influence of vitamin D on pain in IBD patients is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between vitamin D levels and pain severity in IBD patients.

Methods
Participants were recruited from nine hospitals in Norway from March 2013 to April 2014. Clinical data were collected by interview and from medical records. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire was used to measure pain. To explore the possible association between vitamin D levels and pain severity, regression models were fitted.

Results
In total, 407 patients were included, 229 (56 %) with Crohn´s disease (CD) and 178 (44 %) with ulcerative colitis (UC). Vitamin D deficiency (25-OH-D 75 nmol/l in CD (B -2.42; 95% CI -5.06, 0.23), but not in UC.

Conclusions
Pain is commonly reported, followed by more active disease. In this study, female patients reported more severe pain. We found no association between pain severity and vitamin D deficiency, but higher levels of 25-OH-D may influence the experience of pain.